Cancer and Quality of Life: Introduction
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Although cancer researchers have made major strides in recent years and more people than ever are surviving longer, these advances haven’t always been accompanied by improvements in quality of life. That’s the subject of this special Cancer Health report—and it’s the next big challenge for the cancer community. Finding effective new treatments is absolutely essential—after all, there’s no quality of life if there’s no life. Making quality of life more central to cancer care means paying more attention to the experiences of people with cancer, from diagnosis through treatment and survival. Here are some key issues, with recommendations for ways the American system of cancer care has to change and tips on how individuals living with cancer—and their caregivers—can advocate for the best quality of life.

Why Drivers With Diabetes Should Eat Healthy and Stay Active
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The short-term symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels experienced by diabetics can impact driving in a serious way. Blood glucose levels rise after consuming carbohydrates, sugars that come in two main forms simple and complex—also called simple sugars and starches. Self-management means checking blood glucose levels regularly, eating a healthy diet, being physically active, managing stress, and seeing healthcare providers regularly. That involves managing blood glucose levels by eating a healthy diet, losing excess weight, and being physically active. The goal should be to regulate blood glucose levels as best as possible by spreading out carbohydrate consumption, checking glucose levels regularly, taking medications and using insulin as needed.

Is Your COVID Vaccine Venue Prepared to Handle Rare, Life-Threatening Reactions?
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Scientists are still investigating what’s triggering the severe reactions to the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna mRNA vaccines. They suspect the culprit may be polyethylene glycol, or PEG, a component present in both vaccines that has been associated with allergic reactions. People who experience severe reactions shouldn’t get the recommended second dose of the vaccine, the agency said. “Appropriate medical treatment for severe allergic reactions must be immediately available in the event that an acute anaphylactic reaction occurs following administration of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine,” the site says. No allergic reactions have been reported, according to Kelli Newman, a spokesperson for Columbus Public Health.

CDC Requires Negative COVID-19 Test for All Air Passengers Entering U.S.
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CDC Expands Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement to All Air Passengers Entering the United StatesThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expanding the requirement for a negative COVID-19 test to all air passengers entering the United States. Testing before and after travel is a critical layer to slow the introduction and spread of COVID-19. Pre-departure testing with results known and acted upon before travel begins will help identify infected travelers before they board airplanes. Airlines must confirm the negative test result for all passengers or documentation of recovery before they board. If a passenger does not provide documentation of a negative test or recovery, or chooses not to take a test, the airline must deny boarding to the passenger.

A Mediterranean Diet May Prevent Progression of Low-Grade Prostate Cancer
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The Mediterranean diet is well known for its role in helping to prevent heart disease, diabetes and several forms of cancer. But for some men with prostate cancer, this healthy and delicious way of eating may also slow existing disease. Researchers at the university followed 410 men with low-grade prostate cancer on active surveillance. Researchers calculated their Mediterranean diet score across nine energy-adjusted good groups and then split them into three groups (high, medium and low) based on their adherence to diet. For African-American men, these findings are crucial, as a prostate cancer diagnosis, higher risk of death from prostate cancer and disease progression are much higher among this group.

Why Are More Black Americans Left Off Liver Transplant Waiting Lists?
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For the study, researchers reviewed deceased donor liver transplant and waiting list data for 109 high-volume liver transplant centers. This contrast showed that 4.4% of Black patients were disproportionately left off liver transplant waiting lists, compared with other racial groups. Only 2.5% of other racial/ethnic groups were left off the waiting lists. When researchers looked at actual liver transplant surgeries, the disparities shifted slightly. (If individuals knew sooner rather than later about this option, doctors could inform patients about the requirements for placement on liver transplant waiting lists.)

Cancer Mortality Drops for the Second Year in a Row
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Declines in Lung Cancer DeathWhile progress in reducing mortality due to other leading causes of has slowed, it has accelerated for cancer (the second leading cause). “As a result, lung cancer accounted for almost half (46%) of the overall decline in cancer mortality in the past five years and spurred a record single-year drop (2.4% from 2017 to 2018) for the second year in a row.”These rapid reductions reflect better treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type. For all stages combined, survival is highest for prostate cancer (98%), melanoma of the skin (93%) and female breast cancer (90%). While lung cancer and colorectal cancer have declined, the incidence of breast cancer in women increased by about 0.5% per year from 2008 to 2017; this is attributed at least in part to declines in fertility (pregnancy protects against breast cancer) and increased body weight. Colorectal cancer has overtaken leukemia as the second leading cause of cancer death for men ages 20 to 39, reflecting rising trends in colorectal cancer among young adults and declining leukemia rates.

Melinda Gates: Why Women's Voices Must Be at the Center of Rebuilding After COVID-19
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While the world didn’t know much about COVID-19 yet, I was certain of one thing: a pandemic would lead to devastating setbacks for women everywhere. I’d spent 2019 telling anyone who would listen that 2020 was going to be a landmark year for gender equality. I spent the rest of the year collaborating with partners on a major push to expand women’s power and influence in the United States. Disease outbreaks always impact women disproportionately, and COVID-19 was unlikely to be the exception. Governments, businesses, and organizations will begin including women’s voices at all levels of decision-making.

More HIV Treatment, Less PrEP Would Slash New HIV Cases by 94%
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Allocating more money to make sure every U.S. resident living with HIV achieves and maintains an undetectable viral load, rather than focusing on HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), could slash new HIV cases by 94% by 2027. So the CDC model sought to see whether available resources could nearly eliminate new HIV diagnoses in the United States by 2027 without significantly increasing the current total budget of $37.5 billion for HIV testing, treatment and prevention. The model based its estimates of the number of people living with HIV on federal HIV surveillance data and used data from studies of evidence-based interventions for testing, PrEP, care engagement, viral suppression and syringe services programs. The assumption of this model was that with current funding, services wouldn’t be able to reach everyone, but they could be allocated more effectively. This was achieved by dramatically increasing testing among heterosexuals at high risk for HIV between 2018 and 2022 and then ramping up screening among low-risk heterosexuals between 2023 and 2027.

Alcohol Consumption Linked to Cancer Incidence and Mortality in All States
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A new study finds that alcohol consumption accounts for a considerable portion of cancer incidence and mortality in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The article, which appears in Cancer Epidemiology, states that the proportion of cancer cases attributable to alcohol consumption ranged from a high of 6.7% in Delaware to a low of 2.9% in Utah. Similarly, Delaware had the highest proportion of alcohol-related cancer deaths (4.5%) and Utah had the lowest (1.9%). By sex, alcohol-related cancer cases and deaths for most evaluated cancer types were higher among men, in part reflecting higher levels of alcohol consumption among men. In the U.S. on average, alcohol consumption accounted for 4.8% of cancer cases and 3.2% of cancer deaths, or about 75,200 cancer cases and 18,950 cancer deaths annually, during 2013 to 2016.

How President Biden Handles a Divided America Will Define His Legacy
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“We’ve learned again that democracy is precious, democracy is fragile,” Biden said. How Biden handles it will help determine his legacy. House Republicans pleaded for “unity” as they voted against impeaching Trump; to them, unity meant something closer to political impunity. When Biden calls for unity, he envisions bipartisan collaboration, a kind of peace through process. When Trump urged the crowd to march to the Capitol, Centolanza joined them.

A Reluctant Meditator Takes A Weeklong Trip With Jeff Warren — Calm Blog
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For most of my life, I viewed meditation as a repetitive, burdensome practice designed for the devoutly spiritual—or the culturally refined. It wasn’t until I stumbled upon Jeff’s How to Meditate series that I discovered how accessible and exhilarating mindfulness could be. When I heard Jeff was launching a daily meditation series called The Daily Trip, I was elated. I’ve managed a walking meditation here, and a soundscape meditation there, but never settled into a consistent routine. So, I decided to put my new meditation cushion to the test, and experience The Daily Trip every single day for a week.

Taking a Closer Look at COVID-19’s Effects on the Brain
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Taking a Closer Look at COVID-19’s Effects on the BrainPosted on January 14th, 2021 by Dr. Francis CollinsCaption: Magnetic resonance microscopy showing lower part of a COVID-19 patient’s brain stem postmortem. Credit: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIHWhile primarily a respiratory disease, COVID-19 can also lead to neurological problems. The NIH team, led by Avindra Nath, used a high-powered magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner (up to 10 times as sensitive as a typical MRI) to examine postmortem brain tissue from 19 patients. They could find no evidence in the brain tissue samples that SARS-CoV-2 had invaded the brain tissue. Links:COVID-19 Research (NIH)Avindra Nath (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/NIH)NIH Support: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; National Institute on Aging; National Institute of General Medical Sciences; National Cancer Institute; National Institute of Mental Health

Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee December 17, 2020 Meeting Announcement - 12/17/2020 - 12/17/2020
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On This Page Meeting InformationEvent MaterialsDate: Time:Please note that due to the impact of this COVID-19 pandemic, all meeting participants will be joining this advisory committee meeting via an online teleconferencing platform. Materials for this meeting will be available at the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meetings main page. The meeting will include slide presentations with audio components to allow the presentation of materials in a manner that most closely resembles an in-person advisory committee meeting. Webcast InformationCBER plans to provide a free of charge, live webcast of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting. A notice in the Federal Register about last minute modifications that impact a previously announced advisory committee meeting cannot always be published quickly enough to provide timely notice.

Muscle Enzyme Explains Weight Gain in Middle Age
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Muscle Enzyme Explains Weight Gain in Middle AgePosted on May 9th, 2017 by Dr. Francis CollinsThe struggle to maintain a healthy weight is a lifelong challenge for many of us. An NIH-led team recently discovered that the normal process of aging causes levels of an enzyme called DNA-PK to rise in animals as they approach middle age. To see if reducing DNA-PK levels might rev up the metabolism, the researchers turned to middle-aged mice. They found that a drug-like compound that blocked DNA-PK activity cut weight gain in the mice by a whopping 40 percent! The researchers suspected that an increase in DNA-PK in middle age might lead directly to weight gain.

Study: Sleep Could Help Teens Cope With Discrimination
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For teenagers, a good night’s sleep could do more than help them stay awake at school. Researchers found that when teens slept longer and better the night before, they coped better with discrimination and other harsh experiences. Wang stressed that the findings are key to understanding how sleep helps youngsters handle social challenges. Subsequently, this might show how promoting sleep can improve youngsters’ ability to adjust during high school as well as later in their lives. Click here to learn how lack of sleep among teens may lead to future heart troubles.

Understanding Your Treatment Options for Uterine Fibroids
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Most doctors suggest that women with uterine fibroids (also known as leiomyomas or myomas) get regular checkups to monitor any changes to these noncancerous growths. For those who experience severe symptoms, however, treatment options range from medication to surgery. Each woman is different, and uterine fibroids affect individuals in different ways. If periods are painful because of fibroids, women might be advised to use over-the-counter painkillers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Laparoscopic myomectomy removes fibroids through a small incision below the abdomen and usually requires two to seven days of recovery.

Yurts, Igloos and Pop-Up Domes: How Safe Is ‘Outside’ Restaurant Dining This Winter?
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Yurts, greenhouses, igloos, tents and all kinds of partly open outdoor structures have popped up at restaurants around the country. “We’re trying to do everything we can to expand the outdoor dining season for as long as possible,” said Mike Whatley with the National Restaurant Association. Some halted indoor dining altogether, including Michigan and Illinois. Embrace the ‘Yurtiness’Washington state shut down indoor dining in mid-November and has kept that ban in place as coronavirus cases continue to surge. Another, more modern-looking take on outdoor dining involves transparent igloos and other domelike structures that have become popular with restaurant owners all over the country.

Putting Harriet Tubman's Face on the $20 Bill Isn't Progress
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The Biden Administration announced its plan to return to an Obama-era initiative to put Harriet Tubman’s face on the U.S. $20 bill. Based on current designs, a statue of Jackson would remain on the back of the bill, while Harriet Tubman would grace the front. Anti-slavery crusader Harriet Tubman is seen in a picture from the Library of Congress taken by photographer H.B. Nothing short, I am sure, of broad structural change together with specific and targeted systemic interventions to aid Black women and Black communities. Perhaps we need the Harriet Tubman Reparations Act or the Harriet Tubman Abolition of Prisons Act.

Nanoparticle Technology Holds Promise for Protecting Against Many Coronavirus Strains at Once
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Nanoparticle Technology Holds Promise for Protecting Against Many Coronavirus Strains at OncePosted on January 26th, 2021 by Dr. Francis CollinsA new coronavirus vaccine approach works by attaching many spike protein receptor-binding domains (RBDs) to an engineered protein-based nanoparticle. In mice, the vaccine induced a cross-reactive antibody response capable of neutralizing many different coronavirus strains. This new work, published in the journal Science, utilizes a technology called a mosaic nanoparticle vaccine platform [1]. When mixed with the nanoparticle, the spike protein fragments stuck to the cage, resulting in a vaccine nanoparticle with spikes representing four to eight distinct coronavirus strains on its surface. The findings raise the exciting possibility that this new vaccine technology could provide protection against many coronavirus strains with a single shot.

About Us

At Wellness Axis we want to encourage habits of wellness, Increase awareness of factors and resources contributing to well-being, Inspire and empower individuals to take responsibility for their own health, and to support a sense of community. Wellness can be thought of as the quality or state of being in good health.

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